KOMMETJIE

THE VILLAGE

This is one of those rare jewels – a seaside village far enough from the city to be a genuine getaway and close enough for you to enjoy all that Cape Town has to offer. Kommetjie is located in Cape Town’s “far south” on the Atlantic Ocean, only 20km from the entrance to the famous Cape Point Nature Reserve. A village with a population of less than 4 000, Kommetjie is bounded by a long, spectacular beach regarded as Cape Town’s premier surfing spot and the Slangkop mountains that provide multiple hiking options and spectacular views.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From Kommetjie you look across the bay to the world famous Chapman’s Peak Drive and Hout Bay. Part of Table Mountain, one of the New Seven Wonders of the World, peaks out between the Sentinel and Noordhoek Peak. Close by are Simonstown and Boulders Beach, home to the biggest colony of endangered Jackass penguins in the world; Kalk Bay with its quaint fishing harbour, interesting shops and great selection of restaurants; and Noordhoek, where you can go horse riding on the beach or watch the sunset over the sea while sharing a picnic on a wine farm. Kommetjie is one of the most beautiful places in the world to cycle, walk, surf (or watch the action on our world class surfing break), bodyboard, kitesurf, paraglide or simply take a drive. Boating is popular when conditions permit, with a slipway in the village, and crayfishing (in season) is a major attraction for residents and visitors alike. Local restaurants – all within walking distance – serve inexpensive and hearty fare, while some of Cape Town’s most famous eating spots are close by.

In Kommetjie’s “shopping centre” you will find a café, a deli, old school post office, video and bookstores, a hairdresser, and the local vet. There are no supermarkets or bottle stores … but you can find all you need at Long Beach Mall, 10 minutes’ drive up the road. Kommetjie is a place where you can take a real break. Children play in the streets, dogs and their owners socialise on the beach, neighbours know one another, and people of all ages and backgrounds have a shared passion and respect for the spectacular environment that surrounds us.

Alex Krause, 2014